Need We Say More – Fourth Sunday of Advent

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On this Fourth Sunday of Advent, we bring you the final installment of our Need We Say More series, the second reading from today’s Office of Readings:  an excerpt from a commentary of St. Luke’s Gospel by St. Bede.

Bede, who died in the eighth century, was a historian and Doctor of the Church. One of the most learned men of his time, he wrote many commentaries on scripture, though he is most famous for the Ecclesiastical History of the English People.

At age seven his family gave him into the care of a nearby monastery, governed by the abbot St. Benedict Biscop.  He himself says, “From that time I have spent the whole of my life within that monastery, devoting all my pains to the study of the Scriptures, and amid the observance of monastic discipline and the daily charge of singing in the Church, it has been ever my delight to learn or teach or write.”

His life is an example of the incredible contribution to learning, culture, and the preservation of history to which the monks of his time devoted their lives.

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from a commentary on St. Luke’s Gospel by St. Bede, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie.

breviaryOriginally posted December 2013

Need We Say More – Third Sunday of Advent

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On this third Sunday of Advent, we continue our Need We Say More series, bringing you the second reading from today’s Office of Readings:  an excerpt from a fourth century sermon given by St. Augustine of Hippo.  He probably holds the title of most frequent contributor to the Office, as it seems we are always reading something from his sermons or his Biblical commentary.

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from a sermon by St. Augustine, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie.

breviaryOriginally posted December 2013

Need We Say More – First Sunday of Advent

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In praying the Liturgy of the Hours each morning, we are able to begin our day with the Psalms, scripture readings and the Church Fathers. The readings from the Fathers are always packed full of insight and wisdom.  We want to share that with you, so for Advent this year, we’d like to try something new.  On each Sunday of Advent we want to share some ancient wisdom of the Church, taken from the Church Fathers.  They said it best, and in sometimes they said it first. That’s why we’re calling this series Need We Say More

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from the Catecheses of St. Cyril of Jerusalem, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie. breviary

First posted December 1, 2013

A Queen Who Intercedes for Her People

Esther before Ahasuerus;  Giovanni Andrea SIRANI; 1630s;Oil on canvas, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest   The Liturgy of the Hours is part of the heartbeat of our religious life, which, along with Eucharistic Adoration and the Mass, gives a rhythm to our daily life.  The cycle of readings which we go through each year is another element of this rhythm, and at different times of the year we can look forward to rereading our favorite books of the Old or New Testament as we come upon them in the Office of Readings.

Yesterday we began reading the Book of Esther. It only takes a few days to read through before beginning the book of the prophet Baruch, so we spend less time with it than we do with some of the other Old Testament books in the Office of Readings.  But just because it’s short, doesn’t mean it isn’t important.  Esther is one of the prefigurements of Our Lady which we find in the Old Testament.  There were many different women who foreshadowed or mirrored the role Our Lady would have in salvation history:  Eve, Judith, Esther and Ruth, to name just a few  Marian types found in the Old Testament.  The Church Fathers recognized this as early as the second century.  Here’s a great blog post about Esther and Our Lady from Fr. Joseph of the Contemplatives of Saint Joseph.

Need We Say More – Fourth Sunday of Advent

nuns-39

On this Fourth Sunday of Advent, we bring you the final installment of our Need We Say More series, the second reading from today’s Office of Readings:  an excerpt from a commentary of St. Luke’s Gospel by St. Bede.

Bede, who died in the eighth century, was a historian and Doctor of the Church. One of the most learned men of his time, he wrote many commentaries on scripture, though he is most famous for the Ecclesiastical History of the English People.

At age seven his family gave him into the care of a nearby monastery, governed by the abbot St. Benedict Biscop.  He himself says, “From that time I have spent the whole of my life within that monastery, devoting all my pains to the study of the Scriptures, and amid the observance of monastic discipline and the daily charge of singing in the Church, it has been ever my delight to learn or teach or write.”

His life is an example of the incredible contribution to learning, culture, and the preservation of history to which the monks of his time devoted their lives.

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from a commentary on St. Luke’s Gospel by St. Bede, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie.

breviary

Need We Say More – Third Sunday of Advent

nuns-39

On this third Sunday of Advent, we continue our Need We Say More series, bringing you the second reading from today’s Office of Readings:  an excerpt from a fourth century sermon given by St. Augustine of Hippo.  He probably holds the title of most frequent contributor to the Office, as it seems we are always reading something from his sermons or his Biblical commentary.

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from a sermon by St. Augustine, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie.

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Need We Say More – Second Sunday of Advent

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Continuing our Need We Say More series of posts for Advent, we bring you the second reading from today’s Office of Readings:  an excerpt from one of the exegetical works of Eusebius of Caesarea.  He served as Bishop of Caesarea, and died in the fourth century.  He wrote many and various works, including the first surviving history of the Church, which has earned him the title “Father of Church History.”

Please click on the image below to listen to a short reading from the Commentary on Isaiah by Eusebius of Caesarea, courtesy of Sr. Grace Marie.

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