Exult, Let Them Exult!

 

Resurrexit sicut dixit, Alleluia!  He has risen as He said, Alleluia!

The whole of creation joins the entire Church as we rejoice in the Resurrection of Our Lord from the dead.  These beautiful days of the Triduum have been filled with Gregorian chants which have enriched the Church for centuries, in some cases for more than a thousand years.  The poetry of chants like Nos Autem (based on a verse from Galatians as well as Psalm 67), Vexilla Regis (569), and Victimae Paschali (1039) move our hearts and minds to Continue reading

Show Notes – A Good Habit 4/16/14

A Good Habit Show NotesHello, everyone.  Sorry these show notes are so late – between the last days of Holy Week and the Easter celebrations I completely forgot about posting this.

The music featured on the show was from the CD Lent at Ephesus by the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles.  You can find it on iTunes, Amazon, and at their website.

The Jimmy Akin article we mentioned, 6 Things to Know About the Triduum can be found Continue reading

Show Notes – A Good Habit 4/9/14

A Good Habit Show NotesOn Wednesday’s show we encouraged everyone in the San Antonio area to make plans to see Fr. Mitch Pacwa at the Divine Mercy Weekend April 25-27.  Go to www.divinemercyweekendsa.org for more information on the event and to get tickets.

Sr. Grace Marie talked about a blog post by Matthew Warner, (reprinted in the National Catholic Register): Seven Steps to a Holier Life from Mother Theresa.  The post can be found here.

Some of you had some great questions about the Easter Triduum and when Lent officially ends.  Properly speaking, Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends the evening of Holy Thursday before the Mass of the Lord’s Supper.  That doesn’t mean you can haul out the chocolate and steak yet, though, because the fast continues through Holy Saturday, which is the 40th day of the Lenten fast (it’s technically the 46th day, but all Sundays are a celebration of the Lord’s Resurrection, thus they are not days of penance and fasting and don’t make up part of the 40 day count).

The Easter Triduum, or Paschal Triduum, is part of the 40 days of Lent, but it is its own liturgical season.  From the USCCB’s website: The summit of the Liturgical Year is the Easter Triduum—from the evening of Holy Thursday to the evening of Easter Sunday. Though chronologically three days, they are liturgically one day unfolding for us the unity of Christ’s Paschal Mystery.

The single celebration of the Triduum marks the end of the Lenten season, and leads to the Mass of the Resurrection of the Lord at the Easter Vigil.

The liturgical services that take place during the Triduum are:

  • Mass of the Lord’s Supper
  • Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion
  • Mass of the Resurrection of the Lord

Lastly, the quote Sr. Grace Marie read from one of her favorite saints (whom she quotes a lot):

Have patience with all things, but chiefly have patience with yourself.
-St. Francis de Sales

That’s good advice as we near the end of our Lenten journey through the desert.

 

Holy Thursday

As religious especially dedicated to Our Lord’s Eucharistic Presence, Holy Thursday takes on even more meaning. It may seem odd to celebrate just as the Triduum is about to begin, but in our order this day is one of special celebration and solemnity. What took place in the Upper Room over 2,000 years ago is central to our vocations. Where would we be were it not for our Lord’s words “This is my body.” The Heart of the Church is the Eucharist, precisely because it is Christ’s Heart, alive and beating in our midst, feeding us daily.

It has been our community’s custom on this day to ask one another’s forgiveness for any hurts or offenses we may have committed, whether willingly or unwillingly.  Forgiveness is what Christ’s Passion gained for us, it is only right that we should begin the Sacred Triduum by ourselves asking forgiveness.  So if you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. (Mt 5:23-24)

Our midday meal is better described as a feast.  The joyful celebration of the day stands in stark contrast to the solemn silence which descends on the monastery after the Mass of the Lord’s Supper.  We are reminded that the joys of the day exist only in relation to, and because of, the unspeakable suffering and death Our Lord willingly endured for our sake.  Indeed, our vocation, because it is intimately tied to His Eucharistic Presence, could not be without his Passion.